It’s time to catch up a little bit on some theological books that have been hanging out on my mental “I really need to review this” list. To that end, here are five mini-reviews (in the order I read them):

Title: Gay Girl, Good God:
The Story of Who I Was, and Who God Has Always Been
Author: Jackie Hill Perry
Genre: Autobiography / Theology (sexuality)
Pages: 208
Rating: 4.5 of 5

This is probably the most controversial title on this list because it assumes the premise that Scripture passages like 1 Corinthians 6:9-11 should be taken seriously when they say that a homosexual lifestyle is incompatible with biblical morality. This is Jackie Hill Perry’s account of her spiritual experience of “being made new.” She honestly recounts her hurts, struggles, and triumphs as God works in her life, drawing her to himself and helping her deal with issues related to pride, anger, sexuality, etc. Interwoven with her personal story are wise observations about showing love and acceptance, helping new believers, dealing with sin in your life, and much more. My only (minor) complaint was that some threads of her personal story felt like they were left dangling (in an “I forgot to round this off” way rather than a “this is still an ongoing part of my life” way).

How Long, O Lord?: Reflections on Suffering and Evil by [Carson, D. A.]Title: How Long, O Lord?:
Reflections on Suffering and Evil
Author: D. A. Carson
Genre: Theology (Theodicy)
Pages: 233 (plus indices etc.)
Rating: 5 of 5

I think that the most difficult challenge to Christian theism is the problem(s) of evil: basically, “If God is omniscient and omnibenevolent, why is there so much evil and suffering in the world?” This isn’t the most rigorous treatment of the topic that I have read (that would be The Many Faces of Evil by John S. Feinberg), but it is certainly the most readable and useful. This isn’t intended as counseling tool for the person in crisis, but as an aid to thinking through and building a basic biblical understanding of evil, suffering, and related issues beforehand for when life does bring grief and pain. I highly recommend this book!

Title: Does God Desire All to Be Saved?
Author: John Piper
Genre: Theology (Predestination)
Pages: 56
Rating: 4 of 5

Another difficult issue in Christian theology is the interplay between divine sovereignty and human responsibility. One sub-category to that is the question that goes something like “Some passages say God desires all to be saved, but others make it clear that not everyone is…so if God is sovereign meaning that all things happen according to his will what’s going on here?” If you’re curious about the topic, this little booklet is well worth reading for the Reformed perspective on the issue. It isn’t as rigorously argued as it could be in a full-length book, but it’s a basic starting point.

Title: Rescuing the Gospel from the Cowboys:
A Native American Expression of the Jesus Way
Author: Richard Twiss
Genre: Theology (Syncretism, Culture) / Anthropology / History
Pages: 261
Rating: 2 of 5

The history of American treatment of native Americans is shameful, and that often includes the history of missionary work. Many (most?) missionaries identified the Gospel of Jesus Christ so thoroughly with American/Western culture that they deemed virtually all elements of native American culture evil simply by virtue of not being Western (e.g. drums as primary instrumentation). Richard Twiss sought to find ways for native Americans to be followers of Jesus Christ in their culture. I love the premise of the book, but it spoke in such generalities (and with so much angry defensiveness and so many academic buzzwords) that I did not find it very helpful.

Title: Buried Dreams, Planted Hope:
Finding Hope in Life’s Darkest Moments
Authors: Katie Neufeld & Kevin Neufeld
Genre: Autobiography / Theology (Grief, Hope)
Pages: 293
Rating: 3.5 of 5

This is a brutally honest account of loss, grief, and hope. Katie Neufeld’s fiance was killed in a car accident shortly before their wedding. She wrote this book with her father as a record of living with this tragedy and in the hope of helping others who find themselves or loved ones facing similar heartbreaking loss. I appreciate the vulnerable honesty of this book, but to be honest, it could have used an editor. I’m pretty sure it’s self-pub and it shows in the odd formatting/organization and repetitiveness.

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